Litigation Funding Helps Plaintiffs Hold Negligent Drivers Accountable for Their Actions?

January 24, 2017 | Product Liability

You were seriously injured in an auto accident due to a distracted driver. The medical bills are piling up, you need to replace your damage car, you are unable to return to work, and your credit cards have reached their limit. Your attorney said your case won’t settle for at least six months so you asked the bank for a loan; they turned you down. Now what?

You are faced with two options – settle with the insurance company, knowing their offer is much lower than what you deserve and your attorney says he can obtain if you just wait, or apply for litigation funding.

All too often, plaintiffs who are injured settle for far less than they deserve from those who were distracted because they need the money immediately. Litigation funding is a way to cope in terms of paying the bills so your case can proceed to justice you get the full damages you deserve and the responsible person is held accountable.

Litigation funding is a cash advance against your anticipated settlement. There are no upfront costs or fees, no credit check, no employment verification, etc. Whether you are approved is based solely on the strength of your case, and how likely it is you will win. If approved, the money can be used however you wish, although we recommend that it be used for “emergency” needs, such as medical expenses, mortgage, car payments, etc. As a non-recourse type of funding, repayment of the cash advance is made from the case proceeds. We will never require repayment should you lose the case.

Don’t wait another day for the financial relief you need. Litigation Funding Corporation has streamlined the application process; it is quick, easy, and hassle-free with our online application. If approved, funds can be available in as little as 24 hours.

Read the full article http://www.lawfirmchronicle.com/2017/01/litigation-funding-helps-plaintiffs-hold-negligent-drivers-accountable-for-their-actions/

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